Does Death Deliver a Stronger Message?

There are many commercials and public service announcements in our country warning us against the risks of smoking, driving drunk, or driving without wearing a seat belt.  However, are these really all that effective?  People may just glance at these commercials, but never give them a second thought because the message hasn’t impacted them in any profound sort of way.  The commercials often depict situations where the victim comes close to death, but they never actually die.  To the average viewer, this leaves room for hope.  The viewer is never fully faced with the ultimate consequences of their fatal behavior.  Basically, many commercials fall short of delivering  strong enough content to cause a reaction.   Here are two  commercials that utilize death to make a powerful statement:

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3 Responses to “Does Death Deliver a Stronger Message?”

  1. Oh man, that last Thai commercial was a pretty low blow. I really started to get a know in my throat.

    Advertising plays on our deepest conditioned responses, just like country music, hear me out. When we see a scenario that gets us in touch with our fears of really bad things happening: loss, grief, death, it triggers that emotional response. Then, during that emotional fear response, the commercial offers us hope and a solution and we’re just so grateful for being rescued from that fear we make a really positive connection to the product because they set it up like the product rescued us. It’s a cheap shot if you ask me, but excellent to learn from, great find.

  2. I meant “knot in my throat”

  3. Woow that is really deep in a good way though. But it is a very strong message, i mean imagining the loss of a love one or not being able to fully enjoy life is a good reason to take proper per caution and be safe. The advertisers do a good job in this by warning us and it comes across well

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